Stage and screen actor best known for his role in the TV series The Jewel in the Crown

The only unexpected thing about the wonderful actor Tim Pigott-Smith, who has died aged 70, was that he never played Iago or, indeed, Richard III. Having celebrated out a special line in sadistic villainy as Ronald Merrick in his career-defining, Bafta award-winning performance in The Jewel in the Crown( 1984 )~ ATAGEND, Granada TVs adaptation for ITV of Paul Scotts Raj Quartet fictions, he constructed a portfolio of characters both both good and bad who were invariably presented with layers of technological accomplishment and emotional complexity.

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Tim Pigott-Smith in the title role of Mike Bartletts King Charles III at the Almeida theatre in 2014. Photo: Tristram Kenton for the Guardian

He emerged as a genuine leading actor in Shakespeare, contemporary plays by Michael Frayn in Frayns Benefactors( 1984) he was a malicious, Iago-like journalist undermining a neighbouring college chums aspirations as an designer and Stephen Poliakoff, American classics by Eugene ONeill and Edward Albee, and as a go-to screen embodiment of high-ranking police officers and politicians, usually served with a spin of lemon and a side ordering of menace and sarcasm.

He played a highly respectable King Lear at the West Yorkshire Playhouse in 2011, but that performance was overshadowed, 3 years later, by his subtle, affecting and principled turn in the title role of Mike Bartletts King Charles III( soon to be seen in a television version) at the Almeida, in the West End and on Broadway, for which he received nominations in both the Olivier and Tony accolades. The play, written in Shakespearean iambics, was set in a futuristic limbo, before the coronation, when Charles refuses to grant his royal assent to a Labour prime ministers press regulation bill.

The interregnum cliffhanger quality to the show was ideal for Pigott-Smiths ability to simultaneously project the spine and the gelatin of a character, and he brilliantly proposed an accurate portrait of the future king without cheapening his portrait of him. Though not mainly a physical actor, like Laurence Olivier, he was aware of his attributes, once went on to say that the camera does something to my eyes, particularly on my left side in profile, something to do with the eye being quite low and being able to see some white underneath the pupil. It was this physical accident , not necessarily any skill, he modestly preserved, which devoted him a imperil look upon film and television, as if I am thinking more than one thing.

Born in Rugby, Tim was the only infant of Harry Pigott-Smith, a columnist, and his wife Margaret( nee Goodman ), a keen amateur actor, and was educated at Wyggeston boys school in Leicester and when “his fathers” was appointed to the editorship of the Herald in Stratford-upon-Avon in 1962 King Edward VI grammar school, where Shakespeare was a pupil. Attending the Royal Shakespeare theatre, he was transfixed by John Barton and Peter Halls Wars of the Roses production, and the actors: Peggy Ashcroft, with whom he would one day appear in The Jewel in the Crown, Ian Holm and David Warner. He took a parttime undertaking in the RSCs paint shop.

At Bristol University he gained a degree in English, French and drama( 1967 ), and at the Bristol Old Vic theatre school he graduated from these courses( 1969) alongside Jeremy Irons and Christopher Biggins as acting stage managers in the Bristol Old Vic company. He joined the Prospect touring company as Balthazar in Much Ado with John Neville and Sylvia Syms and then as the Player King and, subsequently, Laertes to Ian McKellens febrile Hamlet. Back with the RSC he played Posthumus in Bartons penalty 1974 production of Cymbeline and Dr Watson in William Gillettes Sherlock Holmes, opposite John Woods definitive sleuth, at the Aldwych and on Broadway. He further established himself in repertory at Birmingham, Cambridge and Nottingham.

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Tim Pigott-Smith as the avuncular tycoon Ken Lay in Lucy Prebbles Enron at the Minerva theatre, Chichester, in 2009. Photo: Tristram Kenton for the Guardian

He was busy in television from 1970, appearing in two Doctor Who saga, The Claws of Axos( 1971) and The Masque of Mandragora( 1976 ), as well as in the first of the BBCs modifications of Elizabeth Gaskells North and South( 1975, as Frederick Hale; in the second, in 2004, he played Hales father, Richard ). His first movies were Jack Golds Aces High( 1976 ), adapted by Howard Barker from RC Sherriffs Journeys End, and Tony Richardsons Joseph Andrews( 1977 ). His first Shakespeare leads were in the BBCs Shakespeare series Angelo in Measuring for Measuring and Hotspur in Henry IV Part One( both 1979 ).

A long association with Hall began at the National Theatre in 1987, when he played a coruscating half-hour interrogation scene with Maggie Smith in Halls production of Coming in to Land by Poliakoff; he was a Dostoeyvskyan immigration officer, Smith a desperate, and despairing, Polish immigrant. In Halls farewell season of Shakespeares late romances in 1988, he contributed the company alongside Michael Bryant and Eileen Atkins, playing a clenched and possessed Leontes in The Winters Tale; an Italianate, jesting Iachimo in Cymbeline; and a gloriously drunken Trinculo in The Tempest( he played Prospero for Adrian Noble at the Theatre Royal, Bath, in 2012 ).

The Falstaff on television where reference is played Hotspur was Anthony Quayle, and he succeeded this large actor, whom he much admired as director of the touring Compass Theatre in 1989, playing Brutus in Julius Caesar and Salieri in Peter Shaffers Amadeus. When the Arts Council cut funding to Compass, he widened his rogues gallery with a sulphurous Rochester in Fay Weldons adaptation of Jane Eyre, on tour and at the Playhouse, in a phantasmagorical production by Helena Kaut-Howson, with Alexandra Mathie as Jane( 1993 ); and, back at the NT, as a magnificent, treacherous Leicester in Howard Davies remarkable revival of Schillers Mary Stuart( 1996) with Isabelle Huppert as a sensual Mary and Anna Massey a bitterly prim Elizabeth.

In that same National season, he teamed with Simon Callow( as Face) and Josie Lawrence( as Doll Common) in a co-production by Bill Alexander for the Birmingham Rep of Ben Jonsons trickstering, two-faced masterpiece The Alchemist; he was a comically pious Subtle in sackcloth and sandals. He drew himself together as a wryly observant Larry Slade in one of the landmark productions of the past 20 years: ONeills The Iceman Cometh at the Almeida in 1998, transferring to the Old Vic, and to Broadway, with Kevin Spacey as the salesman Hickey revisiting the last chance saloon where Pigott-Smith propped up the bar with Rupert Graves, Mark Strong and Clarke Peters in Davies great production.

He and Davies blended again, with Helen Mirren and Eve Best, in a monumental NT revival( designed by Bob Crowley) of ONeills epic Mourning Becomes Electra in 2003. Pigott-Smith recycled his ersatz Agamemnon role of the returning civil conflict hero, Ezra Mannon, as the real Agamemnon, ferociously sarcastic while measuring a dollop of modesty against weasel expediency, in Euripides Hecuba at the Donmar Warehouse in 2004. In complete contrast, his controlled but hilarious Bishop of Lax in Douglas Hodges 2006 revival of Philip Kings See How They Run at the Duchess proposed he had done far too little outright comedy in his career.

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Tim Pigott-Smith as King Lear at the West Yorkshire Playhouse in 2011. Photograph: Tristram Kenton for the Guardian

Television roles after The Jewel in the Crown included the titular chief constable, John Stafford, in The Chief( 1990 -9 3) and the much sleazier chief inspector Frank Vickers in The Vice( 2001 -0 3 ). On film, he depicted up in The Remains of the Day( 1993 ); Paul Greengrasss Bloody Sunday( 2002 ), a harrowing documentary reconstruction of the protest and murder in Derry in 1972; as Pegasus, head of MI7, in Rowan Atkinsons Johnny English( 2003) and the foreign secretary in the Bond movie Quantum of Solace( 2008 )~ ATAGEND.

In the last decade of his life he achieved an amazing roster of stage performances, including a superb Henry Higgins, directed by Hall, in Pygmalion( 2008 ); the avuncular, golf-loving entrepreneur Ken Lay in Lucy Prebbles extraordinary Enron( 2009 ), a play that proved there was no business like big business; the placatory Tobias, opposite Penelope Wilton, in Albees A Delicate Balance at the Almeida in 2011; and the humbled George, opposite his Hecuba, Clare Higgins, in Whos Afraid of Virginia Woolf, at Bath.

At the start of this year he was appointed OBE. His last television appearance came as Mr Sniggs, the junior dean of Scone College, in Evelyn Waughs Decline and Fall, starring Jack Whitehall. He had been due to open as Willy Loman in Death of a Salesman in Northampton prior to a long tour.

Pigott-Smith was a keen sportsman, adoration the countryside and wrote four short books, three of them for children.

In 1972 he marriage the actor Pamela Miles. She lives him, along with their son, Tom, a violinist, and two grandchildren, Imogen and Gabriel.

Timothy Peter Pigott-Smith, actor, born 13 May 1946; succumbed 7 April 2017

  • Such articles was amended on 10 April 2017. Tim Pigott-Smiths early performance as Balthazar in Much Ado About Nothing was with the Prospect touring company rather than with the Bristol Old Vic .

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